Video Transcript

 

John:                           
It's John from The Cupboard and we're talking to Kind right now. Tell us about a couple of pieces that we can find in the store.

Kind:                           
We've got some of these Solo bust pieces. I call them bubble butt girls because the perc is like aimed into the action. There's lot of movement going on with those, if you know what I mean. These are the pot head series and they're kind of inspired by William Morris where it's Venetian shaping with sculpture intermingled together to make that form there.

John:                           
Who or what inspired you to get into this business?

Kind:                           
I did woodworking since I was 12 and then I met a glass blower at this folk festival that I went to when I was like 16. It was all fumed glass and it totally ... Like I had no idea where it came from and it bothered the shit out of me, and I had to figure out how to do that. I graduated high school telling people I'm going to be a glass blower. I had a chance to do an apprenticeship with a guy and I jumped in, paid him a bunch of loot, and took care of his kids for a year, and then just kept taking classes and kept at it.

John:                           
Are you using any new techniques that you haven't used before?

Kind:                           
No. This technique that I have is kind of in a way new. It's using this photo resist product that's kind of like a screen printing process and etching out of silver and glass. That's new and a means of, kind of, integrating graphic design into a centuries old art form. It's pretty fun.

John:                           
do you have a favorite piece?

Kind:                           
If I had to choose a solo piece out of the recent show that I just did at the Front Street Gallery, it would probably be ... Its one of these pot head girls but it has an apple core on the top of it. It's kind of about the whole Adam and Eve, forbidden fruit, us being expelled from paradise kind of thing. That was probably my pick of the show.

John:                           
TELL US ABOUT ANY perks to being a glass blower.

Kind:                           
Working for yourself is probably the biggest perk for sure.

John:                           
You've actually made it into a museum. This is a great story. Tell us about that.

Kind:                           
I actually did slides at the Corning Museum of Glass when I took a class there last year. I showed all the audience the slides of the pipes and then ... All of my stuff, you can't really tell they're pipes until you see the other side of them. But the photography side they definitely just look like artwork. I let them know at the end, after they had all praised my artwork, that they were pipes, and the room definitely rustled around and was ... They weren't sure how to feel about it. It was cool though. The Corning Museum of Glass is like a staple for our entire industry. It's a big deal.

John:                           
The Cupboard would like to help you stay in touch with your fans, so what do you use for social media and where do we find you?

Kind:                           
The Instagram I already plugged shamelessly, is probably the best way to get in touch ... is the best way to follow my stuff really. I'm working on a website this year, but it hasn't sprung up yet, so can't plug it yet.

John:                           
What don't your fans know about you that they might be surprised about?

Kind:                           
I grew up in a redneck town in Texas, that's pretty surprising. Like, in the country as a country boy, that's pretty surprising. I don't know. I did woodwork for eight or ten years, that's another thing. That's about it.

John:                           
This is pretty elaborate work. We all know that glass blowing can have it's injuries. Have you ever suffered any injuries?

Kind:                           
Yeah, I've burned and cut myself enough times to not want to do that any more. I've been good, I'll knock on wood right now, just hopefully stay out of that. Yeah, I've cut myself, never had to go to the hospital. I stopped woodworking for that reason. The injuries are more heal-able.

John:                           
We're learning that some people have gone outside the US to work on their craft. Have you done that?

Kind:                           
No but I did ... I just said I was at Corning, I took a class from Chezaray Tofalo. He's one of the Masters of Venetian glass work. He taught there. I'd love to go to Venice and take and intensive with him, but it hasn't been in the cards yet.

John:                           
So tell us who do you look up as inspiration? Has there been a great inspiration for you?

Kind:                           
I'm very inspired by all forms of artwork. I'm really inspired by Banksy's  stuff. He's one of my big ones because he really hit ... It’s all very simple and it deals with so much concept and it's so relative to our society that we live in today. He really hits home for me and I really am inspired by all the stuff that that guy does.

John:               
So we can find this great piece in the store. Tell us a little bit about this.

Kind:               
So I've been making these Nubian style females that are Africanesque for a long time and I've been wanting to incorporate a queen element of a crown and this is the very first one of that series and I'm pretty happy with the way she turned out.

John:               
So some lucky customer is going to have this in their home. For the customer who buys it, tell them a little story. What went into making this?

Kind:               
Okay. So you get the raw tubing of glass in four foot lengths and I break it down into the sections because I have to put this intricate pattern on there and it has to be the right size that it's going to be finished at otherwise the proportions won't read right. Then I cover the glass with silver and gold and then etch out of that, and then cover that with clear. Then I start to make this piece in which I blow and form the shape and then sculpt a face ... Or add and sculpt a face, and then continue to add the rest of the attachments. And then it's on a traditional Venetian foot which I finished traditionally ... Like flaring like they do all of their vessels and their goblets and stuff like that.

John:               
Where can we find your glass art work?

Kind:               
You can find all that fresh new kind business up at the cupboard. CupboardGlassPipes.com

 

YOU CAN ALSO GET GREAT STORIES ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE GLASS BLOWING STARS – THANKS FOR JOINING US ON ANOTHER VERY COOL EDITION OF THE CUPBOARDS – ARTISTS INSIGHTS ON CUPBOARD-GLASS – PIPES – DOT COM