Nathan: 

My name is Nathan Wells, I work over at the Cupboard, part of the staff with those guys. I would first like to welcome you guys to Bogart's, and thank Bogart's for having our semi-annual charity event. Obviously, we've got Salt here from Austin, Texas. Everybody welcome Salt, give him a big round of applause.

Salt: 

Once I saw glassblowing I knew I had to try it, and then once I tried it, I was pretty much hooked.

Nathan: 

And, this year we'll be giving all the proceeds to the Animal Adoption Foundation of Cincinnati, Ohio. So, give them a big round of applause as well.

As you guys know, the Cupboard's been open since 1948, and it's one of the oldest head shops in America at this point.  And we feature artists from all over the country, but we always try to buy direct from these guys, and we strive to educate the community.

We'd also like to thank all of our sponsors, Bogart's, Hemptations, Queensgate Glassblowing, Ozie Davis, Kris Richter, and all the artists, and Hemptations, and all of you guys. We couldn't do it without you either, so thank you for all your help leading up to this, and going all over the city with us and putting up fliers. Thank you very much.

Our first speaker today is Carie Schultz from the Animal Adoption Foundation. She's the Executive Director. It's a nonprofit organization and it's a no kill shelter for dogs and cats that have been abused or abandoned.  And, the AAF provides a safe and humane environment for dogs and cats that are waiting to be adopted. In addition, the AAF aspires to eliminate homeless pets, and strive towards a vision through the operation of a rescue. So, I'm going to let Carie take it over here, and explain a little bit about what she's been doing this year, and many years before.

Carie: 

What makes Animal Adoption Foundation different than other animal rescues is that we really care about the health, both mental and physical of the animals. There are some shelters that put dogs just in little cages, they don't have any natural light, they don't have any access to outdoors. Our dogs can go in and out, and our cats are not in cages, they're in rooms just like a normal house.

But I want to thank Barry especially for putting on this event, and for you guys for coming out. It's an honor to be able to be the beneficiary of the events, and the animal’s thank you.

Nathan: 

Thank you, Carie. Give it up for Carie one more time, guys. Alright, before I yap your head off all afternoon, I'm just going to give a quick bio to the guys that are blowing glass, and the guys that helped set up this whole station for them today and everything. So, bear with me one second. We'll start to the gentleman right, directly to my left, Salt.

Salt: 

To get the glass hot, you have to be in the moment, you have to pay attention or it's going to fall.

Nathan: 

Salt began his glassblowing career in 2001 in Austin, Texas. And, over the last eight years he has spent the time pioneering, developing and refining a sculptural approach to flame working, which has become commonly known as the Salt Style in the glass industry. This organic and evolution based style stands as a direct reflection of the hostile environment that glass pipes are often immersed in. Salt pipe is quick to fight back, not only to defend itself from criticism and legal attack, but also to protect its owners from persecution. Salt's works have been featured on the cover of Wall Street Journal, Hot Breath, Glass Aficionado, and High Times Magazine. Salt Glass continues to be one of the most highly recognizable adorations of the glass pipe as an art medium. It can be found throughout thousands of collections worldwide.

Next, directly to his left is Katie Volk. Give it up for Katie everybody. Katie is an absolute Cupboard favorite, she is family over there.  Katie began glass blowing in 2009, at the Salem Community College in Oregon. After working in the scientific industry for a few years, she began operating her own business as an independent craftsperson. Today, she enjoys running social media sales, and taking free time to get involved in community events.

Oh, right there, give it up for Becky Davis, Katie's partner in crime. Becky is originally from New Jersey, and she's blown glass since 2010. Becky worked under Justin Davis for several years after going to Salem Community College to further her art, and focus on a variety of techniques. Now working in Cincinnati, she operates her own glassblowing company, and makes her own products. Becky gets inspiration from the oddities of everyday life, music, word lingo's, and absolutely incorporating comic relief. Give it up for Becky one more time.

And, her brother, but definitely from another mother, Justin Davis. Give it up for Justin Davis everybody. Justin Davis makes glass art, and fabricates and repairs scientific glassware. He's been doing that since 2000. Justin co-owns and operates the Queensgate Glassblowing Company in Cincinnati. Queensgate Glassblowing is a studio that rents space for a lot of local artists around town. Since starting his career in glass, Justin has taught glass classes, and has owned and operated several glassblowing studios in New Jersey, Colorado, and now in Cincinnati.

We're going to give these guys some time, a couple hours on the torch together. There's going to be a collaboration piece made, and after that it will be auctioned off on the Cupboard's Instagram page, so make sure you follow that page if you guys aren't already. And, make sure you tell your friends later on this week that we are going to auction off the piece that's being made today, and all the proceeds will go to the AAF.  I'm going to let them have at it, we can turn the music back up, and you guys can check out what they're doing. Thank you, guys.

Salt: 

Once I saw glassblowing I knew I had to try it, and then once I tried it, I was pretty much hooked, and that was almost 17 years ago, or 16 years ago now.

Nathan: 

Oh, very cool, man, very cool. When you first started off, did you ever thing you'd get as far as you have, being on the cover of magazines and having your pieces displayed in various galleries around the country and stuff?

Salt: 

The short answer is no, but what really was going on was that the culture wasn't anything close to what it is now, you know, it was much more underground, and there was less of us, and the information was less readily available. The internet hadn't really,  I mean, the internet existed, but it wasn't being used as such a powerful tool then.

Can you bring it just a little closer? Yeah, perfect.

So, no I had no inclination that things we're going to turn into this, and it wouldn't have mattered, like, I just loved blowing glass so much, and working with glass as a material that that was enough to keep me, you know, like on the torch, and eating ramen or doing whatever I had to do to keep blowing glass.

Nathan: 

Cool, cool, alright. As far as your progression and everything you've done as far as the big pieces, what do you think your most elaborate piece has been so far?

Salt: 

I've done a lot of collaborative projects, and a couple of those have been extremely involved. One in particular was a competition piece that I made with Zach Puchowitz and Snic Barnes at a Champ's show. And, we did like, a whole outside block with a sidewalk and a wall, and there was, like, a character pushing a shopping cart, and he had a pet. It was about four feet wide, so that was pretty involved, and we each spent about a week and a half of our collective time on that, so I don't know.

Nathan: 

Very cool.

I'm going to move over here really quick, and ask a few of the same questions to Katie, if you're cool with that. Cool. So, was there an artist that you apprenticed under at first or what got you started in glassblowing.

Kathryn: 

Well, I went to Salem Community College in New Jersey. I was living in North Dakota, had to find something to do after high school, and just happenstance, I was inspired by ceramics, and fell into the idea of glassblowing.  Salem Community College offered me the opportunity to explore art, and scientific industry at the same time. So, I went there and then I had the opportunity to take a scientific career after that. Ultimately, art worked out for the lifestyle that I'd like to live.

Nathan: 

Very cool, very cool. When you started out, did you think it would take you where you are now, moving all over the country and traveling constantly, and getting to work with huge people in the industry and stuff?

Kathryn: 

Well, I guess I had that idea when I first started that maybe we could get there. I didn't realize how big the industry actually was at that day and time. It was 2009, and like you were saying, even then it was still just underground enough; it really started exploding when I was in Salem. I didn't really imagine I would have the opportunity to live the way that I am right now. I'm satisfied that I am though.

Nathan: 

Yeah, awesome.

Audience: 

All the opportunities, you guys have a lot.

Nathan: 

Of course. Yeah.

Salt: 

Kind of the long answer to that question you were asking both of us is that the industry kind of became what it is now because we all enjoy doing this so much. But I think a lot of us would be doing it anyway, you know, so, we didn't expect it, but it's like welcome, you know. It's a combination of all this collective energy, a lot of young people blow glass, and are starting to blow glass all the time, and so all that young, fresh energy makes the scene what it is, you know.

Nathan: 

Absolutely. It's a labor of love, but once a bunch of people start doing that, it's amazing what you can accomplish.

Salt: 

Yeah.

Nathan: 

Yeah. Does anyone in the crowd have any questions? We're going to open up the floor right now. You guys can ask Katie or Salt anything. Anything? Anyone? Put you on the spot.

  Alright, thank you guys so much for coming out. I'm going to let them keep doing their thing. Oh, we do have a question, I'm sorry.

Speaker 5:

I just got a question, I was looking at the pieces over here, and I was wondering; it looks like stone, and it's pretty cool looking, but I was wondering, is that frit?

Salt: 

Yeah, I mean, it probably is. I'm not sure exactly which piece you're looking at, but that's what is it sounds like, yeah.

Fan 1: 

That's what you use?

Salt: 

Using a combination of frit colors and the different sizes of frit, like a larger size frit will create kind of a grain, and so I think that's what you're seeing.

Fan 1: 

Oh, awesome.

Nathan: 

Good question, nice.

Fan 1: 

Good, right?

Nathan: 

Any other questions for our guys up here? Cool. Hey, also, please go over there and check out the Queensgate Glassblowing table, those guys are also a big help to The Cupboard and everything we do.

Salt: 

Really, what I'm trying to do is, I work really hard anyway, and so when it's for charity, I try to dig as deep as I can, and make as much as I can. And, so we kind of have multiple projects going at the same time in order to maximize the time.

Barry: 

That's great, thank you so much, Salt, and Katie, and Becky, and Justin. Thanks so much. All these pieces are all going to be auctioned off on Instagram @Cupboardthe later this week, and all of the proceeds from these auctions are going to the charity. So, really appreciate your time and consideration, and, rock on. Thanks.